Frequently Asked Questions:

Q.

How heavy is the engine installation ?

A.
The engine dry weight is: 92 Kg
The complete installation will require :
Typical Weight: / Kg
Water Radiator......................................................
Header Tank .........................................................
Coolant ................................................................
Oil Reservoir (dry sump)........................................
Combination filter/water separator ........................
Exhaust System....................................................
0.9
0.8
3.6
1.1
0.5
2.3
The type of propeller used affects total engine 
installation weight significantly: e.g:
 
Typical wooden propeller ( Sensenich ).....................
Bolts & Flange........................................................
Constant speed 3 - Blade ( Mulbauer )......................
2  - Blade fixed pitch metal ( McCauley )...................
4.4
0.8
15
10.45
The required battery will be heavier than that normally 
fitted.
 
Typical aircraft battery...........................................
58 amp hour ( 570 amps cranking ) diesel battery aft
mounted...............................................................
12.7
14.5
Q. What is the area of the water radiator required ?
A. Coolant radiator area is dependant on aircraft speed and efficiency of the installation. On the company Luscombe, a relatively slow aircraft by modern standards, a radiator core area of 322 cm2 (50 in2) is used. This allows cruise power to be continuously maintained. A smaller radiator could possibly be used but an early installation with 1/2 the area proved inadequate. It is important to properly duct the radiator to maintain it's efficiency.
Q. Has the engine got a vacuum pump ?
A. The basic engine has no vacuum pump, however one can be fitted as an optional extra.
Q. Will the engine start easily in cold weather ?
A. The engine starts reliably down to -5 degrees C without aids. We recommend use of a cold starting fluid at lower temperatures.
Q. Diesel is not an approved fuel for aviation, what's the score ?
A. The engine runs well on jet fuel of the quality supplied in the UK. The fuel pump is specially adapted to run on low lubricity fuels and jet is an approved aviation fuel but not approved for piston engines. We do not anticipate problems in obtaining C.A.A approval to run our engine on jet fuel. Use of off road diesel ( red diesel ) would be a cheaper option ( less than 20 pence a litre purchased in bulk ) and perfectly legal from a customs and excise viewpoint. The problem is the storage and possible inconsistency in quality as a result that will give the C.A.A difficulties in agreeing approvals.
Q. What is the TBO ?
A. The engine is not yet certificated and TBO is not an issue legally. ( For public category aircraft engines have to be replaced with zero-timed engines at TBO ). We are initially recommending 1000 hours between strip and inspect intervals, but hope to eventually achieve 3000 hour TBO's. The C.A.A would probably only initially approve a few hundred hours between overhalls permitting increases when we can demonstrate extended reliability.
Q.

You talked about the need for an intercooler and optional oil cooler. When are these required ?

A. The intercooler increases engine output by around 15% and reduces thermal loading. The engine has demonstrated 135 hp with intercooler and increased prop speed to 2800 R.P.M but we are not proving durability at these levels. Our target is to provide a bullet proof 100hp engine. The oil cooler will be required unless the engine is operating in a very efficient air frame and sufficient air can be ducted over the engine to remove heat build up.
Q. Is the exhaust system complicated ? It is a two - stroke.
A.

Under starting conditions when the centrifugal compressor is not producing much air the engine starts more easily with a tuned exhaust. This consists of an air expansion chamber and tail pipe which can incorporate a straight through silencer. We supply the exhaust system with the engine.